An Armchair Explorer’s Guide to England

Four years of student living and several periods of fruitless job searching have taught me that sometimes travel, even local travel, can be pretty darn expensive. In these situations, I choose to explore a new place from the comfort of an armchair in my bedroom by turning to books. In my experience, the setting of a novel can play such an important role that it feels as if it is a character in itself. A landscape, a city or even a single building can become so intrinsic to the atmosphere of a novel that it feels as if I am actually there and consequently the book becomes a window into a new place. It also has the advantage of being considerably cheaper than a train ticket. In this spirit, I have trawled the literary landscape and I begin my journey with a partial and completely biased overview of some of my favourite and most evocative English novels.

The Wild and Windswept North

If you are looking for beaches and breezy romance then Yorkshire’s most famous literary exports, the Brontë sisters, are probably not for you. Their tragic lives and enclosed rural upbringing are reflected in their stories and Wuthering Heights by middle sister Emily is arguably the novel most rooted in the landscape. It relies heavily on the ‘perfect misanthropist’s Heaven’ of the exposed, turbulent North York Moors to provide a fitting backdrop for Cathy and Heathcliff. Children of the moors, they are just as untameable and destructive as the land they inhabit. As I sit in my cosy bedroom reading Brontë’s description of the ‘bleak winds and bitter, northern skies,’ I imagine the characters at the mercy of their emotions on the desolate heath below, screaming insults, throwing punches and hurling crockery.

Yorkshire, the land of 'bleak winds and bitter, northern skies...' (Photographer: Lefteris Heretakis; Flickr)

Yorkshire, the land of ‘bleak winds and bitter, northern skies…’ (Photographer: Lefteris Heretakis; Flickr)

Meanwhile the remote settings in eldest sister Charlotte’s Jane Eyre are not quite the same as the jungles of South America or the food markets of Asia, but they perfectly reflect the young governess’s coming of age. The depressing Lowood school squats on a frozen hill and emphasises her physical and spiritual deprivation. I can picture her: a drab, friendless little sparrow, yet she refuses to be cowed and eventually becomes as resolute and unyielding as the ‘grey and battlemented’ Thornfield Hall. After developing a crush on her rather morose employer, she proves to be more than a match for him and after some stirring prose, a big misunderstanding and the death of a conveniently rich relative, everything works out for the best.

Alternatively, for a more cheerful view of the pastoral north, try Frances Hodgson-Burnett’s classic children’s story The Secret Garden, where the spoilt Mary Lennox discovers the hidden beauty in a severe landscape and learns some manners along the way. Then there’s the James Herriot series All Creatures Great and Small, the true tales of a country vet who spent years wandering over hill and dale, meeting strange folk and spending far too much time with his hand up a cow’s backside. More recently, in 2012, Andy Seed produced All Teachers Great and Small, which has a similar premise and records his first year at a rural primary school and the various mishaps he encounters trying to assimilate into the local village. These books explore a placid way of life, perhaps more meaningful to me because they portray a landscape I am familiar with. They may not depict the most glamorous or adrenaline-fuelled side of travel, but the dry stone walls, unpredictable weather and hordes of marauding sheep are spot on.

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Sam Selvon’s ‘The Lonely Londoners’

After spendinga longtime intheUK’scapital, it cannot escape one’s notice that the city’s every corner is home to different religions and races. The city is bright with different cultures and more than 300 languagesare spoken within its limits. With every turn, I find something unfamiliar, something new, something British. That is London’s charm; it is as ifa small world lives within the city’s boundaries.It containsin it people of different backgrounds who have brought their origins with them, after which‘white British London’has become‘multiculturalBritish London’.

This ‘multicultural London’is present today, but one has to wonder where it all began. When did London welcome its firstimmigrants?In truth, it is difficult to say for certain. Yes, there have been some periods of time where there was an influx of immigrants; postWorld WarIIbeing the most well-known. Most authors focus on this period of immigration;they write about it, expressing to the world the migrants’ views about moving to a new country and how they were treated.

The novel was written in 1956, but can still be applied to society today. (Photographer: Koranteng Ofosu-Amaah; Flickr)

The novel was written in 1956, but can still be applied to society today. (Photographer: Koranteng Ofosu-Amaah; Flickr)

One of the novels I studiedthis yearwasThe Lonely Londonersby SamSelvon. The modulewas called ‘Post-war to Post-modern,’so I wasn’t surprisedthat the book was a challengingbut enjoyable read.The postmodern period is known to be a struggle to read, as writers experimented with form and language, presenting texts in new ways which take a while to grasp. It focused on something the world still talks about today: migration.SamSelvonwrites in a strikingly uniqueway; his narrator speaks in creolised English just as the characters in the novel do. The book’s theme, aswell asSelvon’snarrative voice, emphasise the changes within London society.   

The novel deals with the arrival of theWindrushgeneration’and describes the everyday lives of a limited number of members from this community.TheWindrushgeneration’ is the term for the Caribbean migrants who arrived in the UKaboard the SS EmpireWindrushinJune1948.The arrival of theship marked the beginning of post-war mass migration. The Lonely Londoners spans over three years and focuses on the life of a Trinidadian named Moses. He is described as having lived in London for ten years, however has achieved little, which causes him to miss his life in Trinidad.His life and the lives of the otherimmigrants, most ofwhomare young, consist of work and petty pleasures as they try to feel ‘at home’ in this new country. 

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